Urinary Retention

What is urinary retention?

Urinary retention is when the bladder (where you store your urine or 'water') does not empty all the way or at all. It can be acute (sudden) or chronic (long-term). Acute means it comes on real quick or is very bad. Chronic means you have had it for a while.

The acute form is an emergency. You need to see a doctor right away. The chronic form occurs most of the time in older men, but it can also occur in women.

Urinary retention is defined as the inability to completely or partially empty the bladder.1Suffering from urinary retention means you may be unable to start urination, or if you are able to start, you can’t fully empty your bladder.

SYMPTOMS

Symptoms of urinary retention may include:

  • Difficulty starting to urinate
  • Difficulty fully emptying the bladder
  • Weak dribble or stream of urine
  • Loss of small amounts of urine during the day
  • Inability to feel when bladder is full
  • Increased abdominal pressure
  • Lack of urge to urinate
  • Strained efforts to push urine out of the bladder
  • Frequent urination
  • Nocturia (waking up more than two times at night to urinate)

 

 

Medicine

urinary tract infection

 

Overview

 

Female urinary system,   Male urinary system

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection in any part of your urinary system — your kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. Most infections involve the lower urinary tract — the bladder and the urethra.

Women are at greater risk of developing a UTI than are men. Infection limited to your bladder can be painful and annoying. However, serious consequences can occur if a UTI spreads to your kidneys.

Doctors typically treat urinary tract infections with antibiotics. But you can take steps to reduce your chances of getting a UTI in the first place.

Symptoms

Urinary tract infections don't always cause signs and symptoms, but when they do they may include:

  • A strong, persistent urge to urinate
  • A burning sensation when urinating
  • Passing frequent, small amounts of urine
  • Urine that appears cloudy
  • Urine that appears red, bright pink or cola-colored — a sign of blood in the urine
  • Strong-smelling urine
  • Pelvic pain, in women — especially in the center of the pelvis and around the area of the pubic bone

 

 

Medicine

Urinary Tract Obstruction

Overview

A ureteral obstruction is a blockage in one or both of the tubes (ureters) that carry urine from your kidneys to your bladder. Ureteral obstruction can be curable. However, if it's not treated, symptoms can quickly move from mild — pain, fever and infection — to severe — loss of kidney function, sepsis and death.

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Changes in the amount of urine produced
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Blood in the urine
  • Repeated urinary tract infections
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)

 

 

Medicine

Vesicoureteral Reflux

Overview

Vesicoureteral  reflux is the abnormal flow of urine from your bladder back up the tubes (ureters) that connect your kidneys to your bladder. Normally, urine flows only down from your kidneys to your bladder.

Vesicoureteral reflux is usually diagnosed in infants and children. The disorder increases the risk of urinary tract infections, which, if left untreated, can lead to kidney damage.

Vesicoureteral reflux can be primary or secondary. Children with primary vesicoureteral reflux are born with a defect in the valve that normally prevents urine from flowing backward from the bladder into the ureters. Secondary vesicoureteral reflux occurs due to a urinary tract malfunction, often caused by abnormally high pressure inside the bladder.

Children may outgrow primary vesicoureteral reflux. Treatment, which includes medication or surgery, aims at preventing kidney damage.

 

Symptoms

 

Hydronephrosis

Urinary tract infections commonly occur in people with vesicoureteral reflux. A urinary tract infection (UTI) doesn't always cause noticeable signs and symptoms, though most people have some.

These signs and symptoms can include:

A strong, persistent urge to urinate

A burning sensation when urinating

Passing frequent, small amounts of urine

Blood in the urine (hematuria) or cloudy, strong-smelling urine

Fever

Pain in your side (flank) or abdomen

Hesitancy to urinate or holding urine to avoid the burning sensation

Medicine

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